The Tongan Language

The Tongan Language

Langitqq is a language spoken by only six out of seven members of the language family, Linguidae. These people, who live on the islands of Langitqq and Langitqotlan in the Pacific, speak an extinct language known as Langitq. It was the only language in the Pacific Islands until recent times, when a new group of islands came into existence, which were called Langitque. The last group of people to use Langitqq was the Kogi-Takanori, who were in charge of maintaining the language.

 

This group of people is now believed to be the ancestors of all the other linguistic group, which are Langitqi, Langitq, and Langitqotl. They also claimed that they had a single language, which has been identified as Langitqui-Takanori, which is now regarded as the official language of the Polynesian islands. This language is spoken by most of the people living in the Langitqotlan and Langitqui islands. The only exception to this is the Takuqi, who live on the island of Lanai in the south and were used to the dialect of Langitqui-Takanori.

 

Even with the disappearance of the language, it still has a special place in the hearts of the islanders. It is used for many purposes such as religious ceremonies, as well as for writing. The language is still written down today, but only in pictographic form. One can easily learn it by listening to recordings of conversations, or reading books in the language. The language has also come into the public eye in langitqq, because of its link to the famous Polynesian novelist, Robert Pearl Satterthwait.